Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on September 20th, 2010

This is me playing anthropologist, and it’s light, anecdotal, and the rest, but I still found it rather interesting. I was at dinner with a friend while I was in Vilnius, and somehow, for some reason, cardinal directions came up. The friend refused to dare to guess where north was, relative to our positions on […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on September 16th, 2010

Tomukas asked on Twitter on Monday: 3M vėl be Marijono per krepšininkų sutikimą, per didelio honoraro užsiprašė? I didn’t really think about the question that much until I saw this morning’s post by Užkalnis on Marijono Mikutavičiaus “redemption.” Apparently Mikutavičiaus decision not to perform his (sports) anthem “Trys milijonai” at the celebration in Vilnius commemorating […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on May 31st, 2010

What’s there to say? InCulto went to Eurovision, performed a top three song for their group (in sheer terms of energy and quality), but lost out to the usual, boring Eurovision pop. The actual performance felt a bit weird to me, but my ability to approach the song with fresh eyes (or ears) has been […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on May 1st, 2010

Other versions: VO [no subtitles] | YouTube | YouTube (VO) | Facebook | Soundcloud (Radio Edit) [mp3] After watching each permutation of the “East European Funk” video several times in order to write about the song in the lead up to the 2010 Eurovision Song Contest, I was rather infected by the song’s catchiness. ((Apparently, […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on March 10th, 2010

Well, the wheels seem to be in motion. The European Broadcast Union, the people behind Eurovision, is “investigating” the lyrical content of Lithuania’s entry to the song contest, InCulto’s “Eastern European Funk,” to see if it’s “political” in nature. Though I’m certain that my 3000-word meandering on the political content of the song over the […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on March 7th, 2010

Because of the victory in Eurovision 2008 by the Timbaland-produced “Believe” (video of Dima Bilan’s semi-final performance, featuring ice skating by Evgenij Pljushchenko), the 2009 edition of the European Song Contest was hosted by Russia (the victor each year hosts the following year’s competition). Georgia, who had, of course, recently fought a brief war with […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on March 7th, 2010

After a meeting at work this week, we had our usual pause to drink some wine. For some reason, we were especially thirsty and quickly bored through our two-bottle ration. Wanting more, we tried to have the ration increased, but, instead, the suggestion was that we raid our own private stocks. I happen to have […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on March 5th, 2010

I first heard (and wrote) about inCulto in the context of their song “Welcome (to Lithuania),” which was a candidate song to represent Lithuania at Eurovision in 2006. The song lost at the end to LT United’s “We Are the Winners,” which made lots of people on the west side of the Atlantic rather sad. […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on February 25th, 2010

When Lithuania (re-)declared independence on 11 March 1990, I was not yet even in high school. I often wished I was about eight years older, so that I might somehow throw myself into the mix out there, in the wild edge-of-reality process of nation building. ((A cousin of mine, seven years my senior, did send […]

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Moacir P. de Sá Pereira on January 8th, 2010

One of my favorite movies of 2008 was Edward Zwick’s Defiance. I didn’t particularly like it because of its cinematic qualities—though the color, photography, and performances by the two leads (pictured) were excellent—but, rather, for the way it subverts in its retelling a story familiar to every child of the Lithuanian Diaspora: the fight of […]

Continue reading about Brown is never equal to Red; Brown is always worse